Less than 1 in 5 UK managers support ‘hard Brexit’

30 May 2017

 

In the run up to the general election, the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) has revealed that just 1 in 5 UK managers support a so-called “hard Brexit”, with over two third of managers (71%) wanting the government to prioritise securing access to the single market and/or freedom of movement of people in the upcoming Brexit negotiations.

  • With the general election less than three weeks away, the UK's 3.2 million managers make their priorities for a new government clear
  • Brexit is at the forefront of their minds, with just one in five (19%) UK managers favoured a so-called ‘hard Brexit’ 
  • Over two third of managers (71%) think a deal that secures access to the single market and/or freedom of movement of people would be the best outcome of upcoming Brexit negotiations 
  • Two in five (37%) have said decision to call a general election has had a negative impact on their organisation and caused more uncertainty
  • Year of political and economic uncertainty has taken its toll on UK’s managers: 41% are feeling more stressed, 48% have more work to do, and 32% are working longer hours than 12 months ago

Of the 801 UK managers surveyed by CMI, over two third of managers (71%) think a deal that secures access to the single market and/or freedom of movement of people would be the best outcome of the upcoming Brexit negotiations.

Managers’ top five priorities from a new government are:

  1. Securing trade deals with non-EU countries (66%)
  2. Maintaining access to EU talent by guaranteeing the rights of existing residents (58%).
  3. Investing in capital infrastructure (53%)
  4. Maintaining investment in the Apprenticeship Levy (30%)
  5. Promoting UK higher education as an export (27%)

Just 19% called for a reduction in corporate tax to be a top priority.

Commissioned to gauge the sentiment of managers after the surprise general election was announced, the research reveals a significant number have already been affected by the snap election. Just under a fifth (19%) said it had made decision-making more difficult in their organisation, while a similar number (18%) said that it had caused more uncertainty among employees.

Perhaps as a result of the uncertainty, more managers (36%) of managers think the decision to call the election will have a negative impact on their organisation over the next 12 months, than those who think the effect will be positive (26%).

The research also sought to uncover what impact the past 12 months of political and economic upheaval has had on managers. Over a third (34%) said their quality of working life has declined, a similar number (32%) are working longer hours, and 48% say they have more work to do. As a result, there has been a sharp rise in the number of managers who say they are more stressed (41%) and less motivated (35%) than they were 12 months ago.

Read more from the CMI.