Plans to raise primary and secondary teachers' salaries by 2022

05 September 2019

 

Salaries for new teachers are set to rise to £30,000 by 2022-23, under government plans for the biggest reform to teacher pay in a generation.

 

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson announced the plans, underlining his determination to recognise teaching as the high-value, prestigious profession it is.

 

The move would make starting salaries for teachers among the most competitive in the graduate labour market, building on the above-inflation average pay increases for teachers in the last two years.

 

Mr Williamson will set out his proposal to increase teachers’ starting salaries by up to £6,000 in a remit letter to the School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB), asking for their recommendations on raising the starting salaries of new teachers as well as next year’s pay award.

 

The Education Secretary will also ask for the STRB’s recommendations on additional pay reform, including the introduction of progression points in pay. Progression will continue to be linked to performance ensuring the investment best supports the recruitment and retention of the most talented recruits into classrooms.

 

Teacher’s Pension Scheme

The Teacher’s Pension Scheme is also one of the most generous on offer. From September, the government will be fully funding increased contributions into the scheme, so that school leaders can focus as much of their resources as possible on the front line. It means teachers will get an employer contribution of 23.6% on top their salary towards their pension every year to ensure the scheme is fully funded.

 

Flexible working

To ensure teaching continues to be attractive as teachers’ lives develop, a group of Ambassador Schools to champion flexible working are set to be introduced.

 

These will be responsible for sharing good practice on how to successfully implement flexible working in schools, utilising case studies and practical resources for teachers and school leaders. Once fully rolled out, these will form part of an overall flexible working toolkit.